Math

The mathematics department offers a variety of class sequences in order to accommodate the needs and abilities of each student while maintaining focus on preparation for college and stretching each student appropriately.

The emphasis in every math course is balanced among the analytic (algebraic), graphical, numerical and practical approaches. Also, beginning in geometry and continuing through all upper levels, use of technology is taught in increasingly sophisticated depth. In addition to providing appropriate contextual instruction, we hope to instill within students an appreciation for the historical development of mathematics and for mathematics as art.

Algebra 1

Algebra I is an introduction to the use of variables to solve problems. Students learn basic properties and theorems used to solve equations and manipulate expressions. They start to model real world problems using algebraic language. This represents a large leap from the use of purely arithmetic methods for solving problems. This course also includes an introduction to exponents, exponential functions, factoring, quadratic functions and coordinate geometry.

Geometry

Geometry is the study of shapes, measurement and logic. Standard Geometry covers the content of Honors Geometry, but at a slower pace. Topics covered include proof-writing, properties of parallel and perpendicular lines, properties of triangles and quadrilaterals, and congruence and similarity. Geometry students should recognize that they use Geometric concepts including reasoning, measurement, etc. informally in their daily lives. Many topics will also require use of algebra skills learned in Algebra 1.

Geometry Honors

Geometry is the study of shapes, measurement and logic. Topics covered include proof-writing, properties of parallel and perpendicular lines, properties of triangles, congruence and similarity with an emphasis on triangles and circles, and quadrilaterals. Geometry students should recognize that they use Geometric concepts including reasoning, measurement, etc. informally in their daily lives. Many topics will also require use of algebra skills learned in Algebra 1.

Algebra 2

Algebra 2 Honors

Honors Algebra 2 is an introduction to transcendental functions as well as reinforcement of the skills learned in Algebra 1, with a deeper level of mastery and a broader understanding of these basics. Students study methods for solving various types of equations, several basic graph types and their variations, and applications to the real world. It is important at this stage for students to see algebra as the language for describing our physical world and to see the graph as a snapshot of these models.

Algebra 3/Trigonometry

This course is meant to review and build on the material covered in either Algebra 2 or Algebra 2/Trigonometry. In addition to reviewing basic algebra skills, we will study functions in great detail including linear functions, quadratics, polynomials, radical functions, rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions. It is designed for students who need a stronger foundation in basic algebraic concepts in order to be prepared for Pre-calculus.

Precalculus

Designed as a preparation for calculus class, this course includes the study of functions: polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric. The class is designed to strengthen students’ conceptual understanding of problems and mathematical reasoning in solving problems. Students will investigate relations and functions in order to build meaningful models of real world situations.

Calculus Honors

Honors Calculus is the study of limits and rates of change and the ways in which these concepts apply. We study each of these from the numerical, geometric and algebraic perspective, then work on simple applications of each. There is much use of technology, group problem-solving and cooperative work. The goals of the course are to gain an introductory level of understanding of the main concepts, how they interrelate, and how to use these concepts to solve real problems.

AP Calculus (AB)

AB Calculus is the study of limits, rates of change, and areas and the ways in which these concepts apply to real phenomena. We study each of these from the numerical, geometric and algebraic perspective, then work on applications of each. There is much use of technology, group problem-solving and cooperative work. One goal of the course is for students to prepare for the AP AB level exam in May. This goal is consistent with the other, which is to gain a sophisticated level of understanding of the main concepts, how they interrelate, and how to use these concepts to solve real problems.

AP Calculus BC

BC Calculus is an extension of the AB curriculum and is either taught as a year-long class or as an accelerated AB/BC class as dictated by the needs of each particular class. BC adds the following topics: Parametric and Polar equations, Advanced methods of integration, Improper integrals, Advanced methods of solving differential equations, Series and functions expressed as series, and Polynomial approximations of non-polynomial functions.

Each of these topics is explored with the numerical, algebraic, geometric and practical approaches in the same way as in the AB class. Mathematics software is used to enhance discovery and exploration.

AP Statistics

This advanced course is designed specifically to prepare students to take the Advanced Placement statistics exam. The course syllabus includes the specific topics laid out by the College Board: exploring statistical dates, planning and conducting a statistical survey, exploring random phenomena using probability and simulation, and inferring valid conclusions from statistical data. In short, this course offers practical real-life applications of mathematical concepts learned in the regular mathematics curriculum.

Financial Algebra

A course designed to help students become an informed citizen, responsible consumer, and savvy participant in the business world. Students will become aware of financial responsibilities and opportunities. Students will explore ways to maximize earning potential, develop strategies for managing resources, explore skills for the wise use of credit, and gain insight into different ways to invest money. The class will be a combination of textbook and project-based learning, as well as an experience in writing a research paper in accordance with APA guidelines.

Computer Programming

In this elective, students will learn to design and create instructions that computers use to accomplish tasks. The class will focus on the logic and fundamental elements of writing instructions. Assessment is project-based, with students completing an independent project at the end of the course.